Noetic Thesis

The noetic thesis of Franklin Merrell-Wolff holds that there is a third mode, faculty, or function of cognition that transcends sense perception (empiricism) and conceptual cognition (reason) which gives one a way of knowing that leads to metaphysical certainty. Franklin Merrell-Wolff called this cognitive faculty “introception.” He sometimes referred to this function as a third “organ” of cognition perhaps in way similar to the way citta, meaning heart/mind, is thought of in Tibetan Buddhism.

Metaphysical Certainty

Finding metaphysical proof of The Lotka Hypothesis, or The Psychogenic Theory, is like finding truth in pure mathematics. Pure mathematics is possible in the same way pure metaphysics is possible. There is no doubt as to the factuality of pure mathematics. It is abundantly proven. In the same way there is no doubt as to the factuality of pure metaphysical certainty to the practitioner who has completed the necessary investigative protocols.

After graduating from Cambridge, the Great Plague of 1665 forced Isaac Newton into a period of relative isolation, private study, and contemplation. This was one of the most productive periods of his life which saw the development of his theories of calculus, optics, and the law of gravity. The Bible tells us after his baptism Jesus retreated into the isolation of the desert for 40 days before beginning his ministry. Native American traditions contain a rite of passage, an inward vision quest, which is to prepare young people for their future. Franklin Merrell-Wolff after completing his formal education at Stanford and Harvard embarked upon a spiritual quest. Part of the quest included the isolation of his remote ranch located near Lone Pine,California. After 24 years of study and “profound introversion” he reported a nondual experience he called “High Indifference.” Isolation is a key element in creating an environment conducive to such illuminating experiences.

Certainly, we know the proof of pure mathematics. Meditation practice and contemplative inquiry integrated with conventional scientific training leads to an analogous degree of certainty in the Lotka Hypothesis and the Psychogenic Theory.

See “Contemplative Observatory” in the menu above for more details.

The Lawrence L. Horstman Synthesis

Isaac Newton “united the heavens and the earth” by showing that gravity acts not only here on earth, but throughout the cosmos. His three laws are deceptively simple. No layman would ever imagine that they constitute the foundation of the edifice of modern physical science and technology.

Role of the Mind in the Cosmos

However, there was something missing from Newton’s great synthesis, namely, the role of the mind in the fabric of the cosmos. He did not recognize that as a defect in his system, for he was a devout Christian, taking for granted that the mind — a.k.a. the human soul — was a unique gift to humanity from God almighty. Nowadays, however, we recognize that humans are very similar to other animals, and that they, too, must have mental qualities such as motives, desires, sensations, and so forth. So the question is how did minds arise? And why? This is obviously an important question, for the very essence of our lives is mental.

Horstman’s synthesis is similar in scope and in revolutionary implications: he has “united the animate with the inanimate.” Like Newton’s laws, Horstman’s principles are very simple, and yet, after the initial flash of inspiration, it took him decades to work out the details of reconciling the workings of the mind to the laws of physics. Like any difficult math problem or puzzle, the answer always looks simple — after you see how it’s done! Continue reading