Intuition and Subjectivity

Medical researcher Lawrence L. Horstman has much to say about the role of subjectivity and intuition in his book The Lotka Hypothesis, Book I, Elements of Consciousness.

Intuition the Ultimate Source of Knowledge

“There is no doubt that we do indeed now possess a considerable depth of reliable knowledge, if not understanding, of the machinations of the physical world around us and within us. As Planck appreciated, this is quite amazing. But from Lotka’s perspective it is not quite so amazing, since from that perspective we are supergiant molecules, different in possessing some special equipment for thinking and acting but other wise not fundamentally different from smaller, more ordinary molecules. Therefore, it is not quite so astonishing to imagine that we may possess a deep innate knowledge of how the world really works, which knowledge science seeks to make intellectually explicit—seeks to reformulate on the linguistic plane—the ultimate source and arbiter of which is always intuition.” (The Lotka Hypothesis, p. 175)

This type of “intuition” is at the heart of Franklin Merrell-Wolff’s philosophy. It is referred to as “Gnostic Intuition, introception, Dhyana, direct-realization, the Pure Subjective, etc. FMW makes the point that Western science has been successful because of “objectivity.” Galileo combined empiricism with reason to lift mankind out of primitive mythology. Kant came along to point out that both the empiricists and the rationalists where viewing the world through their own subjective lens—they were not seeing “the-thing-in-itself”—not having a direct contact with Reality. Subjectivity can be a big problem if it is filtered through the distortions our psychological structures. Mystics claim to transcend those structures. FMW claimed to go beyond Kant in that a third mode of cognition can be developed which he called “introception.” Introception can be the “rainbow bridge” between the inanimate and the animate, between Western science and Absolute Consciousness.

New Light on Old Problems

“Parting remarks…The next step is to begin applying some of the principles developed in this book to cast new light on some other old problems, most importantly those that affect our lives in the sense of molding our values and thus the character of our society. A good place to begin on that is the theory of evolution, both biological and cultural, which in our view is number two among the great unsolved problems of modern science, as taken up in the next volume.” (The Lotka Hypothesis, p. 179)

The Lotka Project, here proposed, could be part of the “next step.”

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